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Tuesday, February 28, 2012

DSTRYR/SG PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT: "OSSING" REACHES EPIDEMIC LEVELS IN THE GRAPPLING COMMUNITY.

So, many you of seem to have developed something of a bad habit along your BJJ journey.  I'm not talking about your poor hygiene or your Rener Gracie man-crush.  You just say Oss way the hell too much.  And, it's not that your intentions are bad or that your heart's not in the right place.  But, you need to stop.  Consider this your intervention.

Let me tell you a little story:

Way back in '05 when I was a brown belt, I traveled to Tokyo and had the amazing fortune of being invited to roll on several occasions with a group of some of the best lightweight pros in Japanese MMA at the time.  I rolled with Shinya Aoki, Naoya Uematsu, Rumina Sato, Satoru Kitaoka, Kazuyuki Miyata among many others.  I was treated really well and I trained well too. 

Here's the thing, grapplers.  No one spoke English.  And, people did say "oss."  But, they said it way less than you do, grappler.  And, they were Japanese ... and way cooler than you.  I think you catch my drift.  Stop saying "oss" so much and go back to saying things like "I agree with you" and "Cool" or, even, "OK."

Check out Mike Jen's kickass 3rd episode on this very issue. 

13 comments:

  1. You were in Japan and they didn't say "oss" too much? Maybe because it came from Brazil...

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  2. Sorry, not correct. It's a Japanese term.

    My sources (i.e., internet search results) say this explanation is from Gracie Mag:

    "The famous "OSS" has many origins. The first definition of "OSS" is an abbreviation for Onegai Shimasu, which translates into a request, a solicitation, an invitation like "please", "if you may" or "With your permission", much used when inviting a partner to train.

    The second definition of "OSS", also known as "ossu" Means Oshi Shinobu, which conveys the idea (the literal translation has nothing to do with the context) of "persevering when pushed" in other words, never give up, have determination, grit and withstand the most arduous of training. Carrying on without giving up, under all kinds of pressure- that's the idea of inner strength so common in Asian culture.

    Therefore, at the start of a fight, the martial artist will shout, invoke, emanate the "OSS", as a way of letting this sentiment tout. In many sources, "OSS" is defined as a manifestation of ki energy, or in other words, a different kiai(strength) indicating one is ready to fight.

    According to Miyamoto Musashi, in the book "go run no who", the samurai would use three types of shouts: One before combat, the second during combat, when attacking to muster great strength and the third after the fight, to celebrate victory.

    "Oss", beyond demonstrating strong spirit and determination before a fight, is also used to suggest or confirm a piece of information. THus whenever a Sensei asks or informs something, the response is "OSS!" it is the response that will confirm understanding." - Graciemag

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  3. and dstryr for the win!

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  4. Please share the correct guidelines for saying OSS then....

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  5. Definitely Japanese. We used to say it when I trained karate many, many moons ago.

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  6. All of us saying osss is like an American trying to use the word eh, correctly

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  7. The word is actually Osu (still pronounced Oss). The second definition given by Gracie Mag is pretty accurate if you translate the characters that form the word. It's a common word in some martial arts and other macho/rough environments. You wouldn't use it with your boss and customers. As far as jiu jitsu goes, I find kind of silly to use it. It doesn't really match the spirit of the technique or the meaning of brazilian jiu jitsu, which I believe is Arte Suave.

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  8. Now if we could only stop saying "Jitz"...

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  9. Plus 1 to Anon Feb 28 2012 3:37.

    I want to cannibalize people who say "Jitz".

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  10. We used Osu and OSS (as in both definitions) a lot when I trained Kyokushin a long time ago. Before entering the dojo, as a greeting when lined up at the beginning of a session, before initiating sparring, acknowledging an instruction, approaching the instructor with a question (Oss, sempai/sensei) and so forth. We were taught that Osu in the second definition is an integral part of Kyokushin, its core philosophy boiled down to a single expression.

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  11. I thought it was a Karate thing. No BJJ people around these parts (Indonesia) says osu, Karate guys on the other hand...

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  12. I've been training for 2 years now. I've never said to anyone oss and I'm not intending to do that.

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  13. http://www.24fightingchickens.com/2005/08/29/appropriate-usage-of-osu/

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